Wrong on Syria, Wrong on ISIS

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FUTURE45 AD: NO RESPONSIBILITY

Voiceover: “Refugees Fleeing. Terror In Our Streets. Hillary Clinton Was Secretary Of State When It Started, But Takes No Responsibility”

CNN’s Stephen Collinson: The Situation In Libya “Has Spawned A Humanitarian Crisis That Has Seen Boatloads Of Refugees Risk Dangerous Passage Across The Mediterranean.” “Once, Libya seemed set to stand as a triumphant test case of Hillary Clinton's vision on the smart application of U.S. power abroad. But the U.S.-led operation to avert genocide, which eventually led to the ouster of longtime dictator Moammar Gadhafi, left a political vacuum. It has since been exploited by groups like al Qaeda and ISIS that have identified lawless territory ripe for exploitation and a possible beachhead to launch terrorist attacks on Europe. And it has spawned a humanitarian crisis that has seen boatloads of refugees risk dangerous passage across the Mediterranean.” (Stephen Collinson, “Hillary Clinton’s Other Libya Problem,” CNN, 10/21/15)

According To The Syrian Observatory For Human Rights, As Of April 2015, The Death Toll In Syria Has Surpassed 310,000. “Syria is a Hell on Earth that is expanding in plain sight. The death toll there has doubled in a year’s time, if an opposition group is right. Since civil war broke out there, 310,000 people have been killed, the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said Thursday. A year earlier, SOHR’s tally stood at 162,402. And the year before, the United Nations put the death toll at 70,000.” (Ben Brumfield, “Empty Out Boston; Starve Moscow, And You May Understand Some Of Syria's Hell,” CNN, 4/17/15)

In March 2009, Secretary Of State Hillary Clinton Announced That Two Senior State Department Officials Would Head To Syria For Diplomatic Talks. “She announced she was sending two members of her delegation – Jeffrey Feltman and Daniel Shapiro – to Syria, a longtime foe of the Jewish state with whom US relations have been strained for years. ‘There are a number of issues we have between Syria and the United States as well as the larger regional concerns that Syria obviously poses,’ she said after talks with outgoing Israeli Foreign Minister Tzipi Livni.” (Sylvie Lanteaume, “Clinton Will Push For Palestinian State,” Agence Free Presse, 3/3/09)

In A March 2009 Mideast Summit, Clinton “Pointedly Stopped To Shake Hands And Chat With Syria’s Foreign Minister.” “Clinton pointedly stopped to shake hands and chat with Syria's foreign minister during a break in the Mideast summit at Sharm el-Sheik, Egypt. Minister Walad Mouallem said their surprise meeting at an international donors conference was ‘short, but very pleasant,’ and added he was ‘happy it happened.’” (“Hill Buddies Up To Syria,” New York Post, 3/3/09)

Clinton Negotiated A Delegation Of U.S. Military Commanders To Discuss Syria’s Efforts To Stem The Insurgency In Iraq And A Visit By Envoy George Mitchell. “After fits and starts, Syria and the United States have taken steps in recent days that could lay the groundwork for a greatly improved relationship, officials from both countries said yesterday. Syria has agreed to let a delegation of U.S. military commanders visit Damascus in the coming weeks, when they will discuss joint efforts to stem the insurgency in Iraq. The Obama administration's Middle East peace envoy, George J. Mitchell, is also planning a trip to Damascus this month. Mitchell, the highest-ranking U.S. official to visit Syria in four years, will probe whether it is ready to engage in serious peace talks with Israel. The visits were sealed in a phone call Sunday between Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and Syrian Foreign Minister Walid al-Moualem, though Syria has not yet confirmed a date for the military visit.’” (Glenn Kessler, “Syria To Let U.S. Military Commanders Visit For Talks On Iraq,” The Washington Post, 6/3/09)

In June 2009, The United States Declared It Would Appoint An Ambassador To Syria For The First Time In Four Years. “Reports that Washington has decided to reappoint an ambassador to Syria have been welcomed in Damascus. After a four-year diplomatic freeze, analysts here see the development as a sign that President Obama intends to fulfil his pledge to mend relations between the two countries.” (Julien Barnes-Dacey, “Obama To Send Ambassador To Syria, Ending Four-Year Hiatus,” The Christian Science-Monitor, 6/24/09)

VIDEO: Clinton: “We Think That It’s A Fruitful Engagement That We Intend To Pursue. We Have Notified The Syrians That We Are Returning An Ambassador To Damascus.” SECRETARY CLINTON: “As you know, we began a policy of reengaging Syria when I became secretary of state, and working with our team here – Jeff Feltman and others from the State Department and the White House. And we think that it's a fruitful engagement that we intend to pursue. We have notified the Syrians that we are returning an ambassador to Damascus.” (Secretary Hillary Clinton, Press Conference, 7/24/09) Minute 15:03-15:30

Voiceover: “I Don’t Think You Can Draw Any Kind Of Straight Line Between Whether Or Not Something Happened In Syria To ISIS”

AUDIO: During A June 2015 Interview, Clinton Said “I Don’t Think You Can Draw Any Kind Of Straight Line Between Whether Or Not Something Happened In Syria To ISIS” But Rather Attributed To “Anger And Disaffection From Sunni Iraqis.” QUESTION: “I wanted to ask you about Senator Lindsay Graham and a position you both have supported in the past. And that is when President Obama called for limited airstrikes in Syria at the end of 2013. Lindsay Graham, who is also running for president, looks back at that moment and says you know, ‘we didn’t do that. We were looking at it and we didn’t do it and now we have ISIS.’ So to South Carolina, a big military state, what would you say to our voters here. What do you think we should do about ISIS?” CLINTON: “Well, first of all, I think that removing the chemical weapons from Syria, which took both U.S. and Russian cooperation to force the Assad regime to give up those chemical weapons, was significant step forward. It was important not only for the people of Syria but the people of Lebanon, the people of Israel, the people of Jordan and the broader area. So, although I did think that action had to be taken, when the president took another approach and the chemical weapons were removed, that was a positive step. I don’t think you can draw any kind of straight line between whether or not something happened in Syria to ISIS. I think the line that can be drawn is ISIS in large measure is fueled by anger and disaffection from Sunni Iraqis with the government of Maliki, with Shiite dominance, with the role of Iran, all of which did not have to happen if the Maliki government had fulfilled the commitments it made to its own people, and to the United State and to other countries. I think that’s what gave the space that enabled what had been Al Qaeda in Iraq to morph into ISIS. And now we have to deal with it as it is because it presents a threat to the region, but it also presents a more global threat. So I am very much in the camp that says we need to do what the president is doing now and we need to do more to get the Iraqis themselves to push ISIS out. We’re seeing some better efforts between the Kurds, their Peshmerga forces and some of the Iraqi army units, and so hopefully the approach to get the Sunni Arabs in Iraq back into the fight. They should never have been disbanded by the Maliki government. So we have to recreate what we left for Maliki and what he unfortunately destroyed.” QUESTION: “Do you think it’s going to take more troops, more boots on the ground, of American soldiers in combat?” CLINTON: “No, I do not think it would be smart, effective or appropriate for us to put ground troops into Iraq. I do think as the president is now pursuing there’s a role for airpower, there’s a role for intelligence and surveillance, there’s a role for training. There are specific roles that our military is playing and can successfully play in better focusing the Iraqis themselves on what they have to do. Because eventually this will be won or lost by the people in the region. They’re going to have to decide do they want to be oppressed and subjected by this regime of terrorism and give up their right to govern themselves to this group. They have to decide that. So I’m in favor of the steps that the president has taken. I think we have to accelerate them and do as much as we can as quickly as possible to try to build up the Iraq forces.” (Hillary Clinton, Interview With The State, 6/17/15)

Voiceover: “Obama’s Failed To Contain ISIS, And Clinton’s Following Blindly”

As Of November 2015, ISIS Controls “Large Portions Of Eastern Syria And Western Iraq.” “Even if the Sinjar campaign succeeds, the Islamic State has a stranglehold on vital areas in the region, including Mosul and large portions of eastern Syria and western Iraq. That includes most of the Sunni Arab heartland of Anbar Province, where a government-led military push has advanced toward Ramadi but has not yet managed to retake it from the militants.” (Micahel Gordon and Rukmini Callimachi, “Kurdish Forces Retake Strategic Highway in Iraq’s North From ISIS,” The New York Times, 11/12/15)

ISIS Has Committed Mass Murders, Stoned Women And Men For Adultery, Raped Women And Girls, And Beheaded Foreign Journalists And Aid Workers. “In the eastern provinces of Raqqa and Dayr al-Zawr, ISIL committed mass atrocities including executing up to 900 members of the al-Sheitaat tribe from Dayr al-Zawr. The terrorist group stoned women and men accused of adultery, crucified civilians, imposed forced marriage, raped kidnapped girls and women for the purpose of sexual slavery, and beheaded foreign journalists and aid workers, circulating videos of these crimes on social media.” (“2014 Country Reports On Human Rights Practices: Introduction,” U.S. State Department, Accessed 11/12/15)

VIDEO: In June 2014, Clinton Supported Obama’s Handling Of Islamic State, Stating “I Would Have Advised Him To Do Exactly As I Believe He Is Now Doing.” QUESTION: “If you were in the administration today, what would you have advised President Obama to do in Iraq?” CLINTON: “I would have advised him to do exactly as I believe he is now doing. To tell Maliki there will not be any American involvement whatsoever unless you take the following steps, and that we would begin, through our channels, to reach out to the Sunni tribal chiefs that we had worked with to turn back Al-Qaeda in Iraq. And I don’t have the kind of access to the top-secret negotiations any longer, but that’s what I believe is happening. Because when you think about how we were able to stop the spread of Al-Qaeda in Iraq, it was by partnering Shiite with Sunni with American support. I think that’s the only way you’re going to be able to get rid of this so-called ISIS group too. So, that’s what I would be looking for and I believe that’s probably what the President has put under his list of things that have to be accomplished.” (Hillary Clinton, Interview With Hillary Clinton, NDTV, 6/21/14) Minute: 5:41-6:47

June 2014 CNN Headline: “Hillary Clinton Firmly Plants Herself With White House On Iraq.” (Dan Merica, “Hillary Clinton Plants Herself Firmly With White House On Iraq,” CNN, 6/13/14)

Voiceover: “We Need To Do What The President Is Doing Now”

AUDIO: When Answering A Question On What We Can Do About ISIS During A June 2015 Interview, Clinton Said “So I Am Very Much In The Camp That Says We Need To Do What The President Is Doing Now And We Need To Do More To Get The Iraqis Themselves To Push ISIS Out.” QUESTION: “I wanted to ask you about Senator Lindsay Graham and a position you both have supported in the past. And that is when President Obama called for limited airstrikes in Syria at the end of 2013. Lindsay Graham, who is also running for president, looks back at that moment and says you know, ‘we didn’t do that. We were looking at it and we didn’t do it and now we have ISIS.’ So to South Carolina, a big military state, what would you say to our voters here. What do you think we should do about ISIS?” CLINTON: “Well, first of all, I think that removing the chemical weapons from Syria, which took both U.S. and Russian cooperation to force the Assad regime to give up those chemical weapons, was significant step forward. It was important not only for the people of Syria but the people of Lebanon, the people of Israel, the people of Jordan and the broader area. So, although I did think that action had to be taken, when the president took another approach and the chemical weapons were removed, that was a positive step. I don’t think you can draw any kind of straight line between whether or not something happened in Syria to ISIS. I think the line that can be drawn is ISIS in large measure is fueled by anger and disaffection from Sunni Iraqis with the government of Maliki, with Shiite dominance, with the role of Iran, all of which did not have to happen if the Maliki government had fulfilled the commitments it made to its own people, and to the United State and to other countries. I think that’s what gave the space that enabled what had been Al Qaeda in Iraq to morph into ISIS. And now we have to deal with it as it is because it presents a threat to the region, but it also presents a more global threat. So I am very much in the camp that says we need to do what the president is doing now and we need to do more to get the Iraqis themselves to push ISIS out. We’re seeing some better efforts between the Kurds, their Peshmerga forces and some of the Iraqi army units, and so hopefully the approach to get the Sunni Arabs in Iraq back into the fight. They should never have been disbanded by the Maliki government. So we have to recreate what we left for Maliki and what he unfortunately destroyed.” (Hillary Clinton, Interview With The State, 6/17/15)